Year: 2010

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seeroh

Orange and Cardamom Scented Seeroh

I’m snowed in. There’s a party to get to and I’m snowed in. Thankfully the International Incident Colours Party hosted by Penny a.k.a Jeroxie is a kind of party immune to catastrophic weather. The final month of 2010 should be filled with bright colours and big smiles – my recipe for Orange and Cardamom Scented Seeroh (pronounced how it’s spelt) guarantees to make that happen. It’s not too sweet, not too rich and is incredibly addictive. That’s not to say you can chuck a whole load of them in your mouth one after another. Just in case you do decide you want to finish off the whole lot in one go, I thoughtfully substituted a significant amount of sugar in this recipe with friendly agave nectar. You can thank me later. Seeroh is essentially sweetened semolina (don’t gag, it’s nothing like ‘school dinner’ semolina). It can be flavoured anything you like – I try to stick to a couple of complimentary flavours that won’t clash or overpower one another like orange and cardamom. You could …

potato-gratin

Two Potato, Chilli and Cumin Gratin

I don’t know about you but cold weather always makes me lazy. I crave simple, hearty dishes which leave me feeling satisfied and ready to cosy up on a welcoming sofa with a good cookbook. This Two Potato, Chilli and Cumin Gratin is just the trick for such occasions. A combination of sliced potatoes and sweet potatoes, baked in an aromatic infusion of cream and earthy spices is about as comforting as you can get – all you need is a spoon and an appetite to fill.     You can serve this as a vegetarian main course for Christmas, a side for your Christmas dinner, or a substantial starter. This is just the kind of dish I want to make ahead of time, wrap up in foil and effortlessly pop into the oven after a long days work. Serve this gratin with a leafy green salad and it’s the most perfect, inexpensive winter meal. I adore the crisp, golden edges which catch in the heat of the oven and add an abundance of flavour …

foodista-cookbook

OMG. KO Rasoi was published

Sorry about the OMG. As a ‘proper’ food blogger (giggles), I wouldn’t usually promote the use of such abbreviations, but there are times when the OMG and only the OMG will suffice. Except when it’s obligatory to apply the ZOMG, of course.       For someone with such a passion for cooking and writing, being recognised for it and getting published is a big deal. One of the best feelings I’ve ever had was finding out a KO Rasoi recipe was going to be published in a cookbook.     The Best of Food Blogs Cookbook was published in October 2010 by the online cooking encyclopaedia, Foodista. The dream began in 2009 when the brains behind Foodista.com called out to all food bloggers to submit their best recipes for a competition. The entries were divided into courses such as: appetisers, main courses, desserts and cocktails. Not being one to slam the door shut on a hot opportunity, I submitted my favourite recipe featured on KO Rasoi to date – Melt in the Mouth Paneer Kofta.   Entries were …

christmas-cupcakes

Eggless Christmas Cupcakes

Temperatures are dropping, frosty sheens are crystallising everything within reach, and the only way to hold on to your marbles is with Eggless Christmas Cupcakes. A reader took the time to email me a couple of months ago with a request for eggless Christmas cake. The ever popular fruit cake around Christmastime is imperative, so why should non-egg eaters miss out on the goodies? The festive flavours of mixed fruits, nuts and spices fill the house with the most comforting seasonal aroma whilst these pretty cupcakes bake. Simply irresistible. I wanted to create a small twist on conventional Christmas cake by making easy to serve cupcakes, but keeping the flavours traditional and reminiscent of the season was also a must. These little bites of Christmas have been iced with marzipan and white icing in the usual fashion. And although they have been loaded with dried fruits, nuts and spices, I’ve purposely kept them light and not too overpowering or dense. If you’re taking pictures at 4pm in the UK, you may as well be taking …

scrambled-tofu

Scrambled Tofu with Edamame and Black Salt

This month KO Rasoi is ecstatic to be taking part in the International Incident Salt Party hosted by Penny from the delicious blog Jeroxie: Addictive and Consuming. Every month the party has a different theme and each participant creates a dish based on that. They post on the same day and at the same time- just like a regular party. This month’s theme is salt and dull it certainly isn’t. There are hundreds of different salts used for various purposes and they all have their own individual flavours. Some are mellow, some sharp and some completely bizarre. For your feasting pleasure, I picked the salt with the oddest flavour I could possibly think of. Black salt. The crystals of this salt are black, but when they’re ground into a fine powder they take on a dusty pink hue. Gorgeous. And peculiar. Probably every Indian will have tasted black salt (or kala namak/sanchar) and if you ask them what it tastes like they will grin from ear to ear. You see, black salt may appear to …

The Paneer Survey- Results

The results are in and the response was incredible. If you have no idea what I’m talking about the listen up! Last month I compiled a set of questions around the popular Indian cheese, paneer; I asked you how often you ate paneer, made it at home and your favourite dishes. I was interested in finding out your eating habits, how often you like to indulge, and of course, what paneer dishes you can’t resist! *** 1. Almost one third of respondents (29%) eat paneer once a week, with a cool one in ten of you (10%) making it from scratch every time. The second most popular answer was ‘once a month’ (27%) and 5% of you eat paneer more than once a week (which makes you my kind of people!). A small percentage of you (2%) never eat paneer and more than a third (37%) of respondents admitted that they never make fresh paneer at home. I believe that everything delicious is good in moderation- especially when it’s made from scratch, as long as …

paneer-butter-masala

Paneer Butter Masala

  Continuing our homemade paneer theme over the weeks is just as much a treat for me as it is for you. Trust me. One of my favourite paneer dishes is Paneer Butter Masala, whereby chunks of soft paneer are folded into a creamy and sharp tomato sauce made luxurious with unadulterated butter. Hand me a teardrop sheet of puffy, soft naan to mop up all of that sauce and I’m in seventh heaven.   When I wrote the recipe post for Homemade Paneer, I took the opportunity to invite you all to complete my Big Paneer Survey. I asked you about your favourite paneer dishes and how often you like to indulge yourself with them. Well, all will be revealed when the results are posted up next week. The response has been great and I’m so excited to explore them further. If you still haven’t had a chance to complete the Paneer Survey, you can do so here. Take the Big Paneer Survey.     I saw one of my favourite chefs, Sanjay Thumma …

panner-burfi

Sweet, Sweet Diwali

Happy Diwali everyone! KO Rasoi wishes you all a prosperous year full of laughter, love and light. This November, KO Rasoi was featured in the Diwali issue of the Urbanite ezine. Namaste to any new readers from Urbanite- you’re presence is much appreciated.Urbanite covers a whole range of exciting subjects from Food and Drink to Health and Education news. It was a huge honour to have been asked to contribute to the magazine by the wonderful Trix of Tasty Trix, cookery editor for Urbanite. Boy does she have an awesome job! Alongside the Diwali article, I provided a recipe for Urbanite readers for the delicious sweet, Malai Khaja made from homemade paneer. They are pretty little offerings which are perfectly suited to the sparkling ambience of the Diwali festival. Read the full ‘Sparkling Sweets’ article and recipe here. I submitted some information on Diwali, its history and culinary traditions and some comments on modern Indian cuisine. Trix was very innovative with her approach to nouvelle Indian food, using Indo-Chinese dishes as a basis to her …

whole-chillies-mustard

Whole Chillies in a Zingy Mustard Yogurt

Once upon a time I made the mortal mistake of slicing a chilli and then rubbing my itchy eye. I propose that the pain factor is on par with a stinging nettle thrust into the eyeball. Coming from a chilli-mad family I was almost as irritated as my weeping red eye that I hadn’t been forewarned to never ever let this happen. And never will it happen again (I hope). Other activities to avoid after handling chillies: Blowing your nose Cutting your nails Scratching any sort of itch on your body, nor anyone else’s for that matter Petting the dog/cat/bird/domestic rodent Squeezing your spots- you shouldn’t be doing this one anyway Going to the bathroom- you really don’t want to do that What I don’t understand is when recipes call for de-seeded chillies. What’s that all about? Throwing away the seeds of a chilli is like throwing away the juice of a lemon, or the soul of a sadhu. It just defeats the object.  Your fingers will be glad to hear (?) that with this …

Summer Berry Shrikhand

I’m a massive clinger. Ever since the summer sun disappeared behind these pesky autumnal clouds, I’ve been doing everything in my power to cling on to the warm days which were so quickly snatched away from me. Sniff. Due to my recent bitterness towards not receiving delicious freebies on my doorstep like a certain Mr. P, I enquired about sampling some Greek yogurt from Total. Fage Total are specialists in yogurt making and their product range includes choices for all kinds of yogurt lovers. Their full fat Greek yogurt is exactly the thing I need for making Shrikhand. They even have 0% fat and 2% fat Greek yogurts which are perfect for cooking. Bring. Them. On. I’ve been rambling on about Shrikhand for absolutely ages, teasing you with recipes like Eggless Saffron and Lemon Shrikhand Cheesecake and Shrikhand Spice Lamingtons. Evil, no? In all seriousness, I’ve actually been meaning to do this for a long time and thanks to Total, I finally had the motivation to get it done. I chose to combine my sweetened, spiced …

Homemade Paneer

Homemade Paneer

The idea of making cheese at home is one of those beautiful things which you never really appreciate until you actually do it. Paneer is a type of cottage cheese (non-matured) that is popular in India and practically every other place where Indians live, especially among vegetarians. We just can’t get enough. It has quickly become a staple ingredient in dishes on menus in underdog vegetarian restaurants all over the UK. The devotion we feel for this decadent cheese could be likened to the omnivore’s appetite for meat. Paneer is packed with protein and is fairly healthy as far as cheeses go, so don’t feel bad for once in a while binges. I won’t tell if you don’t. Paneer is also famous for making delicious a whole load of otherwise boring dishes. Palak Paneer, Paneer Makhani, Chilli Paneer, Mutter Paneer, Paneer Butter Masala, Shahi Paneer, Paneer Jalfrezi and Saag Paneer to name a few. I will stop there before I drool all over my keyboard and lose all functionality. You can use this recipe to …

mung-dal-paneer-samosa

Little Mung Daal and Paneer Samosas

Isn’t miniature food always better than supersized food? Take cupcakes for instance; tiny morsels of individually iced, fluffy cake is so much more alluring than a massive, calorie-laden, brick-ish cake. Well, for me anyway. In the same way, I would always pick a box of tiny chocolate truffles over a chunky chocolate bar. If you had given me the choice when I was a child I would have definitely supersized every time. Hence the regrettable existence of the unsightly pot-belly that tormented me in my early years.   I consume far too much salt, sugar and fat, which I am told will affect my twentysomething body in a number of gruesome ways before I hit my thirties and forties. This is one of those recipes which will carry most of the blame. Luckily for you, I miniaturised these delicious mung daal and paneer samosas so that you can enjoy them without all of the guilt and fear of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Just don’t eat all of them at once. Having said …