Month: January 2010

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Raghda Patties

Eating the street food from all over the world is one of the best ways of experiencing the particular cultural identity of that country and region. Forget dining in fancy restaurants and five star luxury hotels… just get out there and munch. Soak up all of that tradition and absorb the magical flavours that the locals are used to. Street vendors are the professional chefs of the outdoors. Raghda Patties (pronounced: RughRa PETi-ce) just one of those street dishes you have to try once. This fast food is like no other MacD’s, BK’s or KFC’s. Here’s how we make traditional Gujarati style Raghda Patties at home. They have an East African influence with the raw mango or apple because the majority of my parents’ generation were born and raised there. I plan to post more East African street food/snack food recipes soon because they are so blissful to eat! For the outer covering combine: 4 medium floury potatoes cooked and mashed 275g paneer, finely grated 2 slices of stale bread (with crusts removed), made into …

Srikhand Spice Lamingtons

(For Mr. P’s Re-Inventing the Lamington) Oh I’m late, late, late! I was meaning to do this post a couple of days ago but everything has been so last minute recently! I had some crazy, crazy ideas for this competition and they just all flew out of the window, mostly because they were bending all of the rules of ‘Lamingtonity’ (obviously, the religion of Lamingtons- A neologism if you will). In the end I decided on these simple Srikhand Spice Lamingtons; Srikhand being spiced, sweet Indian yogurt usually eaten as a dessert. Making Srikhand is so easy; plain yogurt is hung for a day in a piece of cheesecloth in order for the water to drain away (almost like gorgeous Greek yogurt). Then it’s beaten with icing sugar and spiced with saffron, cardamom and mace. Nothing Lamington-y about that, huh? Well now there is. I used the Srikhand to fill the Lamington and also give it a delicate, but not overpowering spice kick. The cake part is just my basic eggless sponge recipe (minus the coconut) flavoured …

Pandan Thumbprint Biscuits

Okay. I couldn’t resist posting. I love blogging too much now.  I’m a d d i c t e d. I found this recipe on a website I adore and visit often; Pham Fatale. I’m sure many of you will have visited Jackie’s blog over and over just to gawk at her creative recipes and beautiful photography. This is one recipe that caught my eye months ago and I’ve been pining to try it ever since! I had to adapt the recipe slightly because her recipe uses eggs. She does suggest leaving the eggs out however she says that the cookie does crumble easily this way. Well, let me tell you that I wasn’t satisfied with lettin’ the cookie crumble so I adapted the recipe in order to stop this from happening. It was a wholly successful mission… Almost. I wouldn’t describe my recipe as a cookie recipe but more of a biscuit. A damn delicious biscuit, may I say. It was buttery, crunchy and fragrant with all of that beautiful pandan flavour. Heavenly! And oh …

The Ultimate Eggless Brownies

This. Is. It. You can stop the search. It has arrived: the ultimate eggless brownie. Oh, and did I mention that they can be made vegan too? Oh happy day. In other news, I would like to inform you that I will be absent for a short period of time due to education commitments. Bad times. Of course I would rather blog about my one true love in life (yes, I’m talking food) day in and day out but to get to where I want to be in the future, I must engage with the whole academic shebang. So I’m told. So please don’t be offended if I’m not here to ‘ouhh’ and ‘ahh’ at your glorious recipes, for I will be drowning in the misery of English literature and would obviously prefer to be ‘ouhh-ing’ ‘and ahh-ing’. I’m working on an essay at the moment regarding this extract from Edwidge Danticat; it is the Epilogue to ‘Women Like Us’, Krik? Krak! I would just like to share some pertinent lines with you: Are there …

And the Winner is…

Thank you for all of your wonderful entries to win the old-fashioned chilli chopper. The standard of creative recipes was outstanding and I really do wish I could pick you all as winners! One recipe that really stood out to myself, my friends and my family (yes indeed, some of my nearest and dearest were picking their favourites!) was Butternut Squash Rasam by Priya from Priya’s Easy N Tasty Recipes. Congratulations Priya, we all fell in love with your fantastically unique and healthy rasam recipe! Priya, please e-mail me with the details of where to send your prize. I’m so disappointed I couldn’t send you all prizes because I really loved all of your recipes and you’re all winners to me. I’d like to take this opportunity thank you all for entering my first competition with a very simple but handy prize. You are all stars in my eyes.

A Flurry of Snowflakes and a Cup of Spiced Milk

Unless you’ve been holidaying in the North Pole you must have heard about all of the snow that’s been falling. Well okay, maybe I phrased that badly. In the UK it’s been unnaturally cold for the past two weeks, with temperatures reaching a glacial -20 degrees C! My car is wearing a snug blanket of bright white and probably complaining of frostbite through silent, icy whispers. People are hobbling through soft, pillowy mounds of snow as it crunches, pops and compacts under even the tiniest of feet. I’ve always thought that falling snowflakes and pallid blizzards are beautiful to see… Through snow encrusted window panes. Spiced milk is the new hot chocolate. Of course it isn’t an entirely new phenomenon, my mum used to make it for me as a child. She still does treat me to a cup or two when I’m home although when I’m not, I have to make it myself. It’s never as good as hers. Whether it’s snowing in your part of the world or not, I think you should …

Simple Gujarati Daal

This recipe was requested by Katrina via Ask Sanjana and it is my pleasure to share with you all, my old skool recipe for Gujarati daal. The beauty of Gujarati daal is that it is thinner and therefore lighter than your usual daal, yet also packed full of flavour. It is super important that the daal is hot, sweet and sour (almost in the same way that Thai food is… which perhaps explains my borderline-obsessive love of the Thai cuisine). As you make this daal, please bear the hot, sweet and sour rule in mind and add chilli, sugar and lemon accordingly and as required. I’ve done my best in recording my measurements of these ingredients here as Katrina mentioned that measurements were a little hazy when she used other recipes. I assure you that if you just remember the hot, sweet and sour rule you will serve perfect Gujarati ‘daarbhaat’ (daal and rice- rice recipe here) every time! Ingredients(serves 4) 1 ½ cups oily split pigeon peas (toor or tuver daal)6 cups water 2 green chillies, …

Perfect Basmati… Every Time!

  I know you food bloggers must all know how to cook basmati rice beautifully. Indeed, I bet you’re all professionals at it and it should be the case that you’re sharing your rice cooking tips and techniques with me! Over the years I’ve found that everyone has their own unique ways of performing this sacred ritual. Let me take this opportunity to tell you how it’s done in the KO kitchen… Basmati (extra long grain Indian rice) here is always washed in cold water (I do it until the water runs clear) to remove some of the starch from the rice. This ensures that the rice does not stick together as it boils. I usually soak the rice for at least ten minutes. This softens the grains a little so that they cook quicker. I boil the rice in a large pan filled with plenty of hot water; almost in the same way as you would boil pasta. This keeps the grains separate. As the rice boils I add a wedge of lemon, a …

FAQs

Q. How do I get in touch with you? A. Feel free to drop me an e-mail at korasoi(at)live(dot)co(dot)uk anytime. Q. How do I request a recipe? A. I can fulfill recipe requests providing they are lacto-vegetarian dishes. Send me an e-mail letting me know what you would like to request and I will try my best to come up with something for you. Q. Do you write freelance articles and recipes? A. I am available for freelance work as a food writer. If you require my services then please do send me an e-mail for more details. Q. How vegetarian are your recipes? A. All of my recipes are strictly lacto-vegetarian therefore, at no point are there any meat, poultry, fish or egg products used. I also refrain from using animal by-products such as gelatin, shellac, etc. However, dairy products are used in some of my recipes. Note to vegans: Some of my non-vegan recipes are unsuitable for vegans simply because I have used butter or ghee (clarified butter) as an ingredient. In these cases, you …

Melt in the Mouth Paneer Kofta

How long did you think it would be? I mean, how long did you really think it would before I came back with another paneer recipe? You must have known it wouldn’t be long because you all know how I can’t resist that rich, creamy, irresistible goodness! Kofta (as they are usually referred to in the South Asian Subcontinent) have a heavy presence over various cuisines; from the Arabian Peninsula to what was once Persia to North Africa and also Eastern Europe. The concept of the kofta (or kufteh, köfte, keftes, kufta, ćufta… I could go on for a really long time so I really think I should stop here) is that a ground form of particular ingredients are spiced (according to what herbs and spices are predominantly available in that country) and rolled into a certain shape. Now, they are usually rolled into spherical shapes but in some Arab counties they are shaped rather like long kebabs, therefore the concept obviously varies according to where it is being made. Kofta can be fried, steamed, grilled …