The world of Indian breads is vast and varied. From rotli to naan, paratha and poori, they can be toasted, baked or fried. Adding herbs and spices is common and I love experiment with different flavours. My favourite kind of poori has got to be infused with turmeric and red chilli and is also known as Masala Poori
 
Serve with Sukha Aloo (Dry Potato Curry) and creamy yogurt for am amazing breakfast or brunch. Poori is also popularly served with spicy chickpea curry and is eaten with the hands, filling the fried bread with curry and broken from the outside in. Fiddly but delicious.
 
Traditionally a South Indian bread, they can be made into large discs or little puffy balls. I prefer to make them smaller firstly because they’re cute and secondly, because they rise much more easily which is great if you’re a beginner.

Sooji or semolina is added to give the bread a crisp finish and it is popularly eaten with Shrikhand at auspicious times. Let me tell you, that is probably one of my favourite ways to serve it. Simplicity at its finest.

Masala Poori
 
Ingredients
 
400g chapatti flour
75g gram (chickpea) flour
30g coarse semolina
¼ tsp turmeric
¼ tsp red chilli powder
3 tsp salt
2 tbsp oil
Hot water to bind
 
Oil to deep fry
 
Method
 
1. Place both flours in a large basin and add the chilli powder, turmeric, salt. Make a well in the centre and add 2 tbsp oil.
 
2. Add the hot water little by little, mixing with a spoon. When you are able to do so, bind with your hands. Look for a smooth but firm dough as you will be rolling out the pooris without any additional flour. It’s important for the dough not to be sticky.
 
3. Heat the oil in a large wok.
 
4. Divide the dough into small portions, big enough to roll out into 2 ½-3 inch discs around 2mm in thickness.
 
5. Roll out the pooris out 3 at a time, placing them onto greaseproof paper as you go along.
 
6. To test if the oil is hot enough, drop a small piece of dough into the oil. It is ready when it floats up immediately.
 
7. Fry the pooris, pressing on them gently with a slotted metal spoon so they puff up and become golden. Drain on absorbent kitchen paper and repeat for the rest of the pooris.

What’s your favourite Indian bread and what do you like to eat it with? Leave a comment or share them on Twitter or Facebook.

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