All posts filed under: Blog Awards

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foodista-cookbook

OMG. KO Rasoi was published

Sorry about the OMG. As a ‘proper’ food blogger (giggles), I wouldn’t usually promote the use of such abbreviations, but there are times when the OMG and only the OMG will suffice. Except when it’s obligatory to apply the ZOMG, of course.       For someone with such a passion for cooking and writing, being recognised for it and getting published is a big deal. One of the best feelings I’ve ever had was finding out a KO Rasoi recipe was going to be published in a cookbook.     The Best of Food Blogs Cookbook was published in October 2010 by the online cooking encyclopaedia, Foodista. The dream began in 2009 when the brains behind Foodista.com called out to all food bloggers to submit their best recipes for a competition. The entries were divided into courses such as: appetisers, main courses, desserts and cocktails. Not being one to slam the door shut on a hot opportunity, I submitted my favourite recipe featured on KO Rasoi to date – Melt in the Mouth Paneer Kofta.   Entries were …

Raghda Patties

Eating the street food from all over the world is one of the best ways of experiencing the particular cultural identity of that country and region. Forget dining in fancy restaurants and five star luxury hotels… just get out there and munch. Soak up all of that tradition and absorb the magical flavours that the locals are used to. Street vendors are the professional chefs of the outdoors. Raghda Patties (pronounced: RughRa PETi-ce) just one of those street dishes you have to try once. This fast food is like no other MacD’s, BK’s or KFC’s. Here’s how we make traditional Gujarati style Raghda Patties at home. They have an East African influence with the raw mango or apple because the majority of my parents’ generation were born and raised there. I plan to post more East African street food/snack food recipes soon because they are so blissful to eat! For the outer covering combine: 4 medium floury potatoes cooked and mashed 275g paneer, finely grated 2 slices of stale bread (with crusts removed), made into …

The Turmeric Showcase: Gujarati Khichdi

As promised, it is my pleasure to share with you a recipe in which turmeric is a key ingredient. Gujarati khichdi (pronounced: khiCHdRiy) literally translates to ‘mish-mash’- sounds appetising, right? Well maybe not, but it is one of the most comforting rice and lentil dishes in the whole world (at least in my eyes!) I have been eating it since I can remember; which is probably since I began to grow teeth! Every time I eat a big spoonful of this soft, nutritious, buttery Comfort I am teleported back to my childhood. It can be eaten on its own, mixed with milk for breakfast (although I think it’s good any time of the day!). Or with that other Gujarati favourite, kadhi. If you are not familiar with this dish then you may be familiar with the British version Kedgeree, which is a similar rice dish made with eggs. Kedgeree was adapted from Indian khichdi to suit the appetites of British colonisers during the British colonial rule in India. I think it’s really fascinating how food blueprints tend …