All posts filed under: Chutneys/Pickles/Dips/Sauces

Vegan Masala Cauliflower and Broccoli Tacos with Avocado Sauce Large

Vegan Masala Cauliflower and Broccoli Tacos with Avocado Sauce

I love sitting at the table and enjoying a meal that was created for sharing. Whether it’s a one-pot curry or daal, a hearty salad with warm bread, or these cauliflower and broccoli tacos. With all of the fillings served at the table, this vegan dinner is perfect for assembling as you eat. That way, you can add more or less of whatever you like. The only problem you might have is fitting it all into the one wrap. I’ve made that mistake way more than I care to remember – especially when there’s avocado and coriander sauce involved. The batter is puffy, light and packed with spices reminiscent of bhajia – a super popular Indian starter. Like fish tacos, the bite-sized vegetables are coated and fried until golden and crispy. It’s best to do this right before serving so they’re hot and delicious for your vegan tacos. Packed with lime, garlic and yoghurt, the creamy sauce is perfectly balanced to douse any heat from the fried green chillies. It’s so tempting to eat it …

Stuffed Naan Pockets with Spicy Pizza Dip

Stuffed Naan Pockets with Spicy Pizza Dip

Two of my favourite things in the world are naan and pizza. I love them in all shapes and forms from classic peshwari naan to hybrid naan pizzas – especially when they involve cheese, green veggies and lashings of garlic. I’ll be honest, getting home from a long day at work and sitting down to a naan pizza made with shop-bought garlic and coriander naan and leftover paneer butter masala is one of the most incredible dinners ever! Don’t believe me? Try it yourself. Here’s a simple recipe that celebrates my love of naan and pizza in an easy-to-eat fashion. My recipe for naan pockets uses crumbled paneer and crushed peas as a stuffing for the deliciously-light and buttery naan envelopes. They’re folded into the classic teardrop shape, brushed with a mixture of butter and turmeric, sprinkled with kalonji seeds, and then baked in a hot oven until golden. If you’re not a fan of paneer, these are also great with a filling of grated broccoli and spinach, steamed sweet potato, and cauliflower and green …

Crispy Potato Bhajia (2)

Crispy Potato Bhajia

Served in paper cones with fried green chillies for that ‘bhajia on the beach’ feel I’ve always been a sucker for ordering too many starters in restaurants, especially when it involves Crispy Potato Bhajia (paper-thin potato slices coated in a bespoke spice blend), Hara Bara Kebabs (pea and cauliflower cakes) and Daal Kachori (spiced daal in semolina pastry). I’m told my eyes are bigger than my belly and I’ve never been one to argue with legitimate allegations. Although I love eating out as much as I love home cooking, there’s always one question lingering on my lips as I attempt to make a choice of which restaurant to spend my Friday evening in  – do they serve decent starters? In all honesty, I think I can judge an Indian restaurant menu by the starters they have to offer. If the vegetarian appetisers are limited to samosas and onion bhajis (to this day, I still don’t understand onion bhajis – what are they and where did they come from?) I know I’m not going to be …

peach-chutney

Peach and Cinnamon Chutney

  I will make chutney from any fruits I can get my hands on. Fact.   Whether it’s ripe, unripe, something I love or something I’m not too keen on, turning it in to chutney is guaranteed to make it better.   There’s something about seasonal peaches bubbling away in their own syrupy goodness that makes me feel like somewhat of a domestic goddess. I’m filling the house with a beautiful, fruity aroma and there’s no aerosol or plug-in air freshener in sight. Magic.   Whenever I see an abundance of fruits at a great price, I know what I need to do. The first step is to select the perfect spice partners; I think of classic dishes which pair fruits and spices – Shrikhand, biryani and light and creamy curries. This time it was grilled peaches with cinnamon sugar. It just makes sense.   A touch of ground ginger and Kashmiri chilli adds warmth and the savoury notes iconic of Indian-style chutneys I grew up eating with flatbreads like rotli, naan and paratha.   …

rhubarb-chutney

Rhubarb and Anise Chutney

  I’m stepping into rhubarb terriory. My motto concerning fruits and veggies unknown has always been: If all ideas fail, just chutney it. This week’s recipe challenge for Food Network UK: Create a recipe using a secret seasonal ingredient chosen by the FN UK HQ’s, Chopped style. My latest recipe for the Food Network UK blog is for Rhubarb and Anise Chutney. It was a ‘Chopped’ style challenge (if you’re an avid Food Network fan, you’ll know all about it. If not, you need to switch on the TV and start watching). Good old British rhubarb reminds me of the times I spent devouring crumbles made with ‘proper’ Yorkshire rhubarb while growing up. It also brings back the not-so fond memories of the hideous bellyaches I had after polishing off entire ‘quarter’ bags of rhubarb and custard sweets from my pa’s sweet shop. If you’re a chutney person you really need to bottle up a few jars of this to keep in the fridge. It’s great on toast, in sandwiches with cheese and spread on …

carrot-swede-fritters

Carrot and Swede Fritters with Coriander and Lime Chutney

  I wish we all had three day weekends. One night to recuperate from the long week we just had, one night to party hard and another to recover from the partying – in that order. Don’t get me wrong, I love work, but three day weekends would make me a very happy bunny indeed. Speaking of bunnies… In this week’s recipe, grated carrots, swede and sweet potatoes are bound together with nutty chickpea flour and spices to create these light and crispy fritters. Dip them in a spicy coriander and lime chutney and the flavours come alive. I wanted these fritters to remain a beautiful orange colour, keeping the filling grated and not mashed. In order to do this, I blanched the whole carrots, swede and sweet potatoes for around 6 minutes, refreshed in iced water and then grated them. This way, the vegetables became bright coloured and part-cooked, yet still held their shape. These would make a great starter as part of an Indian or international menu and are perfect for lunch or …

whole-chillies-mustard

Whole Chillies in a Zingy Mustard Yogurt

Once upon a time I made the mortal mistake of slicing a chilli and then rubbing my itchy eye. I propose that the pain factor is on par with a stinging nettle thrust into the eyeball. Coming from a chilli-mad family I was almost as irritated as my weeping red eye that I hadn’t been forewarned to never ever let this happen. And never will it happen again (I hope). Other activities to avoid after handling chillies: Blowing your nose Cutting your nails Scratching any sort of itch on your body, nor anyone else’s for that matter Petting the dog/cat/bird/domestic rodent Squeezing your spots- you shouldn’t be doing this one anyway Going to the bathroom- you really don’t want to do that What I don’t understand is when recipes call for de-seeded chillies. What’s that all about? Throwing away the seeds of a chilli is like throwing away the juice of a lemon, or the soul of a sadhu. It just defeats the object.  Your fingers will be glad to hear (?) that with this …

garlic-chutney

Sizzlingly Hot Garlic Chutney

I always think carefully before I indulge in a dish chock-full of garlic. What am I doing tomorrow? Am I going anywhere? Who am I meeting with? I love it when the answers are, ‘nothing’, ‘no’ and ‘nobody’. Controversially, I think that gobbling garlic swamped dishes should only really be done in the privacy of one’s own home; curtains shut tightly, chain on the door and phone off the hook. We don’t want any disturbances. I admire this almost ritualistic way of paying homage to the humble garlic by eating it privately, behind closed doors. I suppose it’s just human nature to enjoy doing something that makes you ask yourself whether you should really be doing it at all. Did you know that garlic is slightly toxic and even if you are just preparing it, your breath and pores will take on that love it/hate it garlic smell. It is also a top blood purifier. Isn’t it great when the pros outweigh the cons? To get that garlic smell off your hands, wash them with washing …

plum-conserve

Fiery Plum Conserve

One day I shall pay for this sweet sugar addiction of mine Purple is definitely the colour trend of the season over here. As autumn approaches, every clothes shop is bursting at the seams with plums, violets and amethysts. Not only does this make choosing clothes really difficult, but it also fills my mind with thoughts of seasonal produce and autumn flavours. That’s right, I think about food when I shop for clothes. There’s something seriously wrong there. I felt the urge to jump on the purple preserve bandwagon after Mr. P of Delicious Delicious Delicious made a stunning blackberry jam from a portion of the 5kg of sugar he found on his doorstep one morning (here’s the story). Regardless of the fact that there is a distinct lack of freebies coming my way (gosh, I’m so bitter), P’s jam looked so divine that I had to follow suit. I think that aniseed adds an extra dimension to both sweet and savoury dishes. It’s deep, liquorice-like flavour provides sweet dishes with a savoury edge, and …

greengage-chutney

Fruity Greengage Chutney

I love fruits with spice. Not just any spice, mind you. Some fruits are made for particular spices, some not so much. It’s a bit like a school playground for the tastebuds. Let’s ponder this a little more; oranges love cloves like apples love cinnamon… and star anise fancies a little apple and orange. It’s a love triangle. Lemon and cardamom have been lifelong chums and are always ready indulge in a spot of tag, but if anyone else tries to join in they get a little uneasy. Oh, and strawberries are fond of black pepper but black pepper doesn’t really enjoy playing with other summer berries.   Do you follow? Experimenting with fruits and spices is like entering yourself into a lottery where the combinations are extensive, as are the possibilities of amazing as well as not so amazing results. You’ve just got to be prepared to take a gamble. Are you feeling lucky? I won’t lie; I have a tooth as sweet as a diabetic’s craving for syrup, so I only have one …

paneer-kebabs-lime-fi

Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs and Summer Quinoa Salad

  My Facebook fans wanted it, so my Facebook fans are getting it; introducing the KO Rasoi BBQ Season 2010. Over the next few posts I will be showcasing some of my very own delicious vegetarian barbecue ideas for these beautiful, long summer days. Kicking off our series are recipes for Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs with a cooling Summer Quinoa Salad. Drool. Spicy, refreshing and full of punchy flavours, this tag-team delivers flavour combinations from barbecue heaven. Overreacting I am not.   A drizzle of yogurt is always good. Always. This takes hardly and time to prepare and the recipe can easily be doubled or tripled according to how many guests you have over… Or indeed halved if you’re planning to devour your barbecued deliciousness all by yourself. So please, please get your barbecues out, slap on some sunscreen and cook with me during the KO Rasoi BBQ Season 2010! Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs (serves 4-5) Ingredients For the Marinade Blend together: 160g/2 cups fresh coriander Zest and juice of two zingy limes 5 …

lemon-preserve

Sweet and Sour Indian Lemon Preserve

      This is such a simple preserve to put together and it tastes out of this world. Small Indian lemons are macerated in a golden sweet-salty turmeric liquid for at least two weeks until the whole mixture becomes delectably syrupy. Both kids and grown-ups will love it!   Enjoy this lemon preserve with Indian breads like puri, paratha or thepla and rice or lentil dishes like khichdi. It’s also a perfect dip for poppadoms!     I used small Indian lemons from my local Indian grocers as they are the perfect size for this preserve, and they pack a huge punch. They’re tiny, yet lethal. Rather like myself. Ingredients 10 small unwaxed Indian lemons 250ml lemon juice 1/2 cup granulated white sugar 2 tsp ground sea salt ¼ tsp turmeric powder Method 1. Gently scrub each lemon under warm water, rinse and dry. 2. Halve the lemons and put them in a sterilised glass jar. 3. In a small saucepan heat the lemon juice and add the sugar, salt and turmeric and heat until …