All posts filed under: Paneer/Tofu Dishes

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tandoori-kebabs

Vegetarian Tandoori Kebabs from Scratch

A lot has happened since our Mughlai banquet. Mainly the week (yes entire week) I lost my appetite. Sunday mornings are meant to be lazy, meant to keep you in eager anticipation of a delicious brunch. Am I right or am I right? Two Saturdays ago I went for a delicious Indian meal and some unexpected but very welcome ‘curryoke’ (karaoke post-Indian banquet, apparently). I feasted on Mutter Paneer, Okra, Daal Makahni and Naan. By the end of the night (with a little help from Asha Bhosle and Atif Aslam) I was a content little madam. I went home to fall asleep to a late Will Smith movie and some Nat Geo Wild. I tossed and turned, trying to get comfy in and amongst dreams of being stranded in the Amazon rainforest with Agent J and blueberry pancakes for brunch. Fast-forward six hours and I’ve forgotten all about the man in black and a comforting brunch. I was sick – so sick I lost my appetite for a week. Don’t get me wrong, I still …

pistachio-cauliflower

Mughlai Banquet Menu

  Saffron and Lemon Shrikhand Doughnuts – a recipe for my new Food Network UK chef page – they’re perfect for finishing off a grandiose banquet. After a good few weeks of cooking deliciously rich and decadent dinners (it’s been hell having to eat them all by myself, I tell you), I’m finally ready to compile a menu of the best Mughlai-inspired dishes from KO Rasoi. The aim of the game was to put together something truly majestic – something which will leave your guests speechless (partly because their mouths will be preoccupied devouring the meal). Mughlai cuisine is one of my new favourites, with its use of only the most aromatic spices, flowers and nuts. Indeed, it’s no wonder it was reserved for only kings and queens of the Mughal Empire. Shahi Paneer Stuffed Okra   By now you must know how I love contrasting flavours and textures, and if you do too, you need to try this. Juicy okra stuffed with homemade paneer which has been spiked with golden sultanas and heady fennel. …

shahi-paneer-okra

Shahi Paneer Stuffed Okra

Coconut, dried fruits, nuts and rich spices are what make exotic Shahi cuisine fit for royalty – and for you and I.   Dishes created in imperial kitchens during the rise of the Mughal Empire (in the heart of northern India and on the now India-Pakistan border) echoed the deeply aromatic flavours of Persia.   The Mughals, known for their extravagance and majestic style, were no different to their eating habits. Rich sauces made with ground nuts, kebabs, koftas and kormas are some of the most delicious and popular bites to come from this era.   My recipe for Shahi Paneer Stuffed Okra is not a traditional Mughlai dish – it’s entirely my own creation cooked up during a 2am food fantasy. I’ve taken my inspiration from the delicious Shahi cuisine I love to indulge in a little too often.   By now you must know how I love contrasting flavours and textures, and if you do too, you need to try this. Juicy okra stuffed with homemade paneer which has been spiked with golden …

foodista-cookbook

OMG. KO Rasoi was published

Sorry about the OMG. As a ‘proper’ food blogger (giggles), I wouldn’t usually promote the use of such abbreviations, but there are times when the OMG and only the OMG will suffice. Except when it’s obligatory to apply the ZOMG, of course.       For someone with such a passion for cooking and writing, being recognised for it and getting published is a big deal. One of the best feelings I’ve ever had was finding out a KO Rasoi recipe was going to be published in a cookbook.     The Best of Food Blogs Cookbook was published in October 2010 by the online cooking encyclopaedia, Foodista. The dream began in 2009 when the brains behind Foodista.com called out to all food bloggers to submit their best recipes for a competition. The entries were divided into courses such as: appetisers, main courses, desserts and cocktails. Not being one to slam the door shut on a hot opportunity, I submitted my favourite recipe featured on KO Rasoi to date – Melt in the Mouth Paneer Kofta.   Entries were …

scrambled-tofu

Scrambled Tofu with Edamame and Black Salt

This month KO Rasoi is ecstatic to be taking part in the International Incident Salt Party hosted by Penny from the delicious blog Jeroxie: Addictive and Consuming. Every month the party has a different theme and each participant creates a dish based on that. They post on the same day and at the same time- just like a regular party. This month’s theme is salt and dull it certainly isn’t. There are hundreds of different salts used for various purposes and they all have their own individual flavours. Some are mellow, some sharp and some completely bizarre. For your feasting pleasure, I picked the salt with the oddest flavour I could possibly think of. Black salt. The crystals of this salt are black, but when they’re ground into a fine powder they take on a dusty pink hue. Gorgeous. And peculiar. Probably every Indian will have tasted black salt (or kala namak/sanchar) and if you ask them what it tastes like they will grin from ear to ear. You see, black salt may appear to …

The Paneer Survey- Results

The results are in and the response was incredible. If you have no idea what I’m talking about the listen up! Last month I compiled a set of questions around the popular Indian cheese, paneer; I asked you how often you ate paneer, made it at home and your favourite dishes. I was interested in finding out your eating habits, how often you like to indulge, and of course, what paneer dishes you can’t resist! *** 1. Almost one third of respondents (29%) eat paneer once a week, with a cool one in ten of you (10%) making it from scratch every time. The second most popular answer was ‘once a month’ (27%) and 5% of you eat paneer more than once a week (which makes you my kind of people!). A small percentage of you (2%) never eat paneer and more than a third (37%) of respondents admitted that they never make fresh paneer at home. I believe that everything delicious is good in moderation- especially when it’s made from scratch, as long as …

paneer-butter-masala

Paneer Butter Masala

  Continuing our homemade paneer theme over the weeks is just as much a treat for me as it is for you. Trust me. One of my favourite paneer dishes is Paneer Butter Masala, whereby chunks of soft paneer are folded into a creamy and sharp tomato sauce made luxurious with unadulterated butter. Hand me a teardrop sheet of puffy, soft naan to mop up all of that sauce and I’m in seventh heaven.   When I wrote the recipe post for Homemade Paneer, I took the opportunity to invite you all to complete my Big Paneer Survey. I asked you about your favourite paneer dishes and how often you like to indulge yourself with them. Well, all will be revealed when the results are posted up next week. The response has been great and I’m so excited to explore them further. If you still haven’t had a chance to complete the Paneer Survey, you can do so here. Take the Big Paneer Survey.     I saw one of my favourite chefs, Sanjay Thumma …

panner-burfi

Sweet, Sweet Diwali

Happy Diwali everyone! KO Rasoi wishes you all a prosperous year full of laughter, love and light. This November, KO Rasoi was featured in the Diwali issue of the Urbanite ezine. Namaste to any new readers from Urbanite- you’re presence is much appreciated.Urbanite covers a whole range of exciting subjects from Food and Drink to Health and Education news. It was a huge honour to have been asked to contribute to the magazine by the wonderful Trix of Tasty Trix, cookery editor for Urbanite. Boy does she have an awesome job! Alongside the Diwali article, I provided a recipe for Urbanite readers for the delicious sweet, Malai Khaja made from homemade paneer. They are pretty little offerings which are perfectly suited to the sparkling ambience of the Diwali festival. Read the full ‘Sparkling Sweets’ article and recipe here. I submitted some information on Diwali, its history and culinary traditions and some comments on modern Indian cuisine. Trix was very innovative with her approach to nouvelle Indian food, using Indo-Chinese dishes as a basis to her …

Homemade Paneer

Homemade Paneer

The idea of making cheese at home is one of those beautiful things which you never really appreciate until you actually do it. Paneer is a type of cottage cheese (non-matured) that is popular in India and practically every other place where Indians live, especially among vegetarians. We just can’t get enough. It has quickly become a staple ingredient in dishes on menus in underdog vegetarian restaurants all over the UK. The devotion we feel for this decadent cheese could be likened to the omnivore’s appetite for meat. Paneer is packed with protein and is fairly healthy as far as cheeses go, so don’t feel bad for once in a while binges. I won’t tell if you don’t. Paneer is also famous for making delicious a whole load of otherwise boring dishes. Palak Paneer, Paneer Makhani, Chilli Paneer, Mutter Paneer, Paneer Butter Masala, Shahi Paneer, Paneer Jalfrezi and Saag Paneer to name a few. I will stop there before I drool all over my keyboard and lose all functionality. You can use this recipe to …

mung-dal-paneer-samosa

Little Mung Daal and Paneer Samosas

Isn’t miniature food always better than supersized food? Take cupcakes for instance; tiny morsels of individually iced, fluffy cake is so much more alluring than a massive, calorie-laden, brick-ish cake. Well, for me anyway. In the same way, I would always pick a box of tiny chocolate truffles over a chunky chocolate bar. If you had given me the choice when I was a child I would have definitely supersized every time. Hence the regrettable existence of the unsightly pot-belly that tormented me in my early years.   I consume far too much salt, sugar and fat, which I am told will affect my twentysomething body in a number of gruesome ways before I hit my thirties and forties. This is one of those recipes which will carry most of the blame. Luckily for you, I miniaturised these delicious mung daal and paneer samosas so that you can enjoy them without all of the guilt and fear of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Just don’t eat all of them at once. Having said …

paneer-kebabs-lime-fi

Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs and Summer Quinoa Salad

  My Facebook fans wanted it, so my Facebook fans are getting it; introducing the KO Rasoi BBQ Season 2010. Over the next few posts I will be showcasing some of my very own delicious vegetarian barbecue ideas for these beautiful, long summer days. Kicking off our series are recipes for Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs with a cooling Summer Quinoa Salad. Drool. Spicy, refreshing and full of punchy flavours, this tag-team delivers flavour combinations from barbecue heaven. Overreacting I am not.   A drizzle of yogurt is always good. Always. This takes hardly and time to prepare and the recipe can easily be doubled or tripled according to how many guests you have over… Or indeed halved if you’re planning to devour your barbecued deliciousness all by yourself. So please, please get your barbecues out, slap on some sunscreen and cook with me during the KO Rasoi BBQ Season 2010! Coriander and Lime Paneer Kebabs (serves 4-5) Ingredients For the Marinade Blend together: 160g/2 cups fresh coriander Zest and juice of two zingy limes 5 …

paneer-peas-spring-rolls

Roll Up! Roll Up! Paneer, Sweetcorn and Peas Spring Rolls

I like nothing more than a good spring roll. Add paneer to the mix and you’re halfway there. I think a good spring roll is summed up by a well seasoned, well spiced filling, and a light, crisp pastry. But this recipe doesn’t make a good spring roll. It makes a whole lotta delicious, taste bud tingling spring rolls. Follow these steps and you won’t be able to keep your mitts off of them. I made my own paneer by splitting (with ¼ cup lemon juice) around 3 pints of whole, boiling milk, then straining through a piece of cheesecloth. I then pressed the paneer in the cheesecloth with weights to remove excess liquid. If you don’t want to do this then you can buy a block of paneer from any good supermarket, and grate it to use in this recipe. Peas, sweetcorn and coriander add a mouth-watering lightness that pairs beautifully with the dense paneer. For spicing, I use whole cumin seeds, sesame seeds and lots of coarsely ground black pepper; these ingredients are …