All posts filed under: Punjabi Cooking

Slow Cooker Aubergine Makhani

Slow Cooker Aubergine Makhani

Beautiful, butter-soft aubergines simmered in a rich makhani sauce for three hours are what you’ll be dreaming about tonight. It’s velvety smooth and perfect with basmati rice and fluffy Garlic and Coriander Naan. I’ve recently fallen in love with my slow cooker and have been batch cooking soya mince and black bean chilli, spicy coconut daal and this delicious Aubergine Makhani. The basis my sauce is an irresistible combo of butter (it’s not a makhani without butter!), tomatoes, selective spicing and a touch of cream to finish. It makes for a perfectly-balanced sauce to coat juicy aubergine pieces. Slow cooking is a great way of making sure your aubergines remain chunky and don’t fall apart. If you’re looking for an equally delicious aubergine recipe where they are first blackened, then mashed, head this way. One of my favourite dishes to eat in Indian restaurants is Paneer Makhani or Paneer Butter Masala. If it’s on the menu, there’s a 99% chance I’ll be all over it. After trying it in a number of different restaurants, I …

Paneer Bhurji Kati Rolls (4)

Paneer Bhurji Kati Rolls

This is not just any old wrap. This is a flavoursome, satisfying chapatti wrap filled with rich paneer, tangy lemon and mouth-watering spices. Seriously, M&S would be proud. These kati rolls are simple, filling and perfect for lunch or dinner. You can stuff them with anything you like, from scrambled paneer to Bombay potatoes. Traditional kati rolls come from Kolkata where they are essentially a kebab wrapped in paratha. Just like sandwiches and wraps you’ll find all over the world, from gyros to banh mi, kati rolls are a street food favourite because they lend themselves to eating on-the-go – a must in any bustling city. My take on kati rolls combines my passion for paneer bhurji (North Indian-style spiced, scrambled paneer) and hot chapattis. I figured if I was going to fill something with pure paneer and vegetables, I’d better use a chapatti rather than ghee-filled paratha. If you’re not bothered about the extra calories, I’d recommend you go the whole hog and wrap your bhurji in hot, buttery paratha. There’s nothing quite like it. …

Jalebi Paratha Dough

Jalebi Paratha

I’m yet to meet someone who doesn’t bask in the crisp, flaky gloriousness of ghee-cooked paratha. They’re like the classy, generous older sister of chapattis and perfect for scooping up rich curries and daals. You can glam them up any way you like; stuff them with spicy mashed potato, crushed peas, fresh paneer or grated vegetables. My personal favourite is peppery mooli (white radish), but I’m also wild about plain flaky paratha including the ones that are made with fresh coconut milk, South Indian style. These Jalebi Paratha get their name from the bright orange Indian sweets, Jalebi because of their beautiful coiled shape. To make Jalebi, first a batter is made with flour and yoghurt, which is piped directly into hot oil in coiled circle shapes to create a beautiful ‘spider-web’. The hot fritters are then lifted out of the oil and plunged into a hot sugar syrup spiced with cardamom and saffron until soaked through. They are served warm or cold at special occasions with ‘gathia’, long savoury snacks made with chickpea flour …

Daal Makhani Recipe

Daal Makhani

Comfort food doesn’t get any better than a bowl of piping hot, creamy, spicy lentils topped with crispy onions, fried green chillies and crunchy fried spinach. Urad, or black gram lentils are a staple in Indian homes and are used for making a variety of dishes from simple daals to elaborate Masala Dosa. They’re packed with protein and have a heartier texture than mung beans. Because of their tougher texture, they need to be cooked thoroughly to extract as much of their creamy starchiness as possible. I find the easiest way to do this is to soak the urad daal overnight and cook them using a pressure cooker – something you’ll find in every Indian home, rather than it being just an alien contraption collecting dust in the back of your Nan’s cupboard. Growing up, I was reared on Gujarati Urad Daal rather than the richer Punjabi version of black gram lentils more popular on restaurant menus around the globe. We were taught that eating urad daal every Saturday (the holy day of Hanuman, the …

aloo paratha

Aloo Paratha

I fell in love with paratha at the age of four, when I was the proud owner of various miniature kitchen utensils that looked like they’d been manufactured in toy town. I’d use my hot pink chapatti board and rolling pin to make baby paratha, which my mum would cook and my pa would wolf down with gusto, whilst telling me I was a great chef. And that was all it took – I had discovered my love of Indian breads. Forget your typical puff of glitter – for this strange little Indian Barbie, childhood was all about that magical cloud of chapatti flour. Indian breads, without a doubt, are perceived as the fiddliest things to make at home, especially if you’ve never done them before. Aloo Paratha are made by stuffing mashed, spiced potatoes and onions into chapatti dough and rolling so that the dough envelopes the layer of filling inside. Then they’re lightly sizzled in ghee, butter or oil until golden all over. Once cooked, the filling will remain enclosed in the crisp …

lassi

The Ultimate Savoury Lassis

Last week I ordered a salted lassi at an Indian restaurant and got it in a pint glass. I didn’t even get a straw. It was an entirely bizarre experience which I can’t say I’d like to try again – lassi moustaches really don’t suit me. Got lassi? Forget beer and wine, I think nothing compliments an Indian meal better than lassi. It’s a cooling, yogurt-based drink with palate cleansing properties that balance out a spicy Indian meal perfectly. You really couldn’t get a more traditional drink. The roots of lassi are firmly embedded in Punjabi cuisine from Northern India and parts of Pakistan. Many Indian and Pakistani regions have adapted the refreshing beverage to suit their individual cooking styles and tastes.    Tempered lassi with curry leaves and mustard seeds. A fragrant South Indian touch. There are so many variations of lassi out there that I had to limit myself to just four versions of salted lassi. In case you hadn’t noticed, I prefer salted over sweet. Sweet lassis are really popular equivalents to smoothies, in …

paneer-butter-masala

Paneer Butter Masala

  Continuing our homemade paneer theme over the weeks is just as much a treat for me as it is for you. Trust me. One of my favourite paneer dishes is Paneer Butter Masala, whereby chunks of soft paneer are folded into a creamy and sharp tomato sauce made luxurious with unadulterated butter. Hand me a teardrop sheet of puffy, soft naan to mop up all of that sauce and I’m in seventh heaven.   When I wrote the recipe post for Homemade Paneer, I took the opportunity to invite you all to complete my Big Paneer Survey. I asked you about your favourite paneer dishes and how often you like to indulge yourself with them. Well, all will be revealed when the results are posted up next week. The response has been great and I’m so excited to explore them further. If you still haven’t had a chance to complete the Paneer Survey, you can do so here. Take the Big Paneer Survey.     I saw one of my favourite chefs, Sanjay Thumma …

I ♥ You, Saag Paneer! And a Competition!

It’s sad. Yet true. I am such a paneer fiend. I bet you £5 (that’s all I have) that my dad says to me tomorrow after reading this post, that I shouldn’t keep making paneer dishes. Of course he is right. Moving swiftly on… I use a 1:1 ratio of saag (mustard leaves) to spinach because I prefer a more subtle mustard flavour, which can often overpower the dish. If you don’t use enough saag you will produce a dish resembling palak (spinach) paneer, which is equally delicious but technically not saag paneer. If you would like to add less saag you will create delicate flavoured curry which will not be as pungent as traditional dishes (such as sarson ka saag from north India). I love the combination of this hot, buttery and spicy green sauce with soft paneer (sorry dad) and I am sure many of you do too. Otherwise it would not be one of the most popular dishes on Indian restaurant menus all over the world. Imagine that… saag paneer takes over …

Easy Peasy Aloo Paneer Paratha (Sadly, there are no peas in this recipe)

Want a bite? It would be awesome if I actually added peas to my Easy Peasy Aloo Paneer Paratha. I wish I had thought of the ironic jokes I could have made before I rolled them. Oh well. I’m sure these would be delicious with peas too! I served my paratha with Crispy Tindora and Sweetcorn Curry which are not traditionally served together but the combination does work! There are a few different parts to this recipe but you can make the filling ahead of time and keep it in the fridge until you’re ready to roll! Do try making your own paratha, they are simple and scrummy- the only rule is that you have to use ghee (or margarine) to shallow fry them… Because it’s the law! Easy Peasy Aloo Paneer Paratha (makes around 18 paratha) Ingredients for the stuffing 3 medium potatoes, boiled and mashed1 large onion, minced (really finely)4 cloves garlic, minced2 tbsp ginger, minced½ cup finely chopped coriander1 green chilli, minced (more or less if you prefer)Juice from 1 lemon1 ¼ cup …