All posts tagged: cumin seeds

potato-cashew

Potato and Cashew Nut Curry (Sukha Bateta Nu Shaak)

Let me introduce you to the first part of one of the most amazing brunches known to man (and woman) – Potato and Cashew Nut Curry with Little Deep Fried Breads, also known as Sukha Bateta Nu Shaak and Masala Poori. My heart just did a little somersault. My fondest memories of eating this dish lie with the time I lived with my parents. Waking up on sleepy Sunday mornings (or to be more accurate, Sunday midday in my case) to the smell of aromatic curry leaves, fresh ginger and freshly fried spicy dough permeated my nostrils, coaxing me out of bed and into the kitchen to witness exactly what everyone needs to experience at least once in life – Bateta Nu Shaak and Masala Poori for brunch. The whole shebang was like a starved bear waking up from hibernation to the smell of honey-drenched baklava. Well, something like that anyway. This dry curry epitomises Gujarati cooking with its fluffy potatoes, crunchy cashews and light spicing, complimented by a squeeze of zingy lemon juice. Garnish …

slideshow-pau-bhaji

Butter Pau Bhaji

All Butter Pau Bhaji Recipe If you love Pau Bhaji with heaps of creamy butter as much as I do, I hope you’ll love my article for FN UK’s blog in honour of all things street food. You discover what happened when I cooked up some Pau Bhaji in their test kitchen and my experience eating Pau Bhaji on the street in one of my most favourite Indian food cities, Leicester.  I was sitting on a burning wall devouring £3.50 worth of hot, spicy Pau Bhaji. It was heavily spiced but not with chillies – the intense heat came from a medley of ground cinnamon, cloves, cumin seeds, coriander seeds and fennel seeds. The bread was hot, buttery and perfect for scooping up the delicious bhaji. Now, I’ve tasted great Pau Bhajis in the past and I’ve also made good Pau Bhajis, but the truth is that I much prefer it when someone else makes the effort to sizzle some up for me. Any takers? Read the article here. Get the recipe here. FYI, my …

lassi

The Ultimate Savoury Lassis

Last week I ordered a salted lassi at an Indian restaurant and got it in a pint glass. I didn’t even get a straw. It was an entirely bizarre experience which I can’t say I’d like to try again – lassi moustaches really don’t suit me. Got lassi? Forget beer and wine, I think nothing compliments an Indian meal better than lassi. It’s a cooling, yogurt-based drink with palate cleansing properties that balance out a spicy Indian meal perfectly. You really couldn’t get a more traditional drink. The roots of lassi are firmly embedded in Punjabi cuisine from Northern India and parts of Pakistan. Many Indian and Pakistani regions have adapted the refreshing beverage to suit their individual cooking styles and tastes.    Tempered lassi with curry leaves and mustard seeds. A fragrant South Indian touch. There are so many variations of lassi out there that I had to limit myself to just four versions of salted lassi. In case you hadn’t noticed, I prefer salted over sweet. Sweet lassis are really popular equivalents to smoothies, in …

sev-tameta

Quick Sev and Tomato Curry (Sev Tameta nu Shaak)

  Firstly, I’m going to make an attempt at guessing what you’re thinking; “What the heck are sev and where do I get them from?” These are great questions, great questions to which I don’t have great answers. I know that’s not very helpful however, I’ll do my best to explain the deliciousness of this mysterious ingredient. Because you need to know. Sev are a Gujarati snack, closely related to ‘gathia’ in the way they’re made from chickpea flour and fried. They come in all different sizes and are classed as a ‘farsan’ or savoury snack. They’re best described as crunchy, nutty and great for sprinkling on top of cassava dishes and spiced yogurts. In this classic Gujarati recipe I’ve re-created à la KO I’ve used jinni (small) sev which is very traditional and also very cute. The tiny little strands soak up the sweet, tangy and spicy flavours of the rich tomato base.   I used cherry tomatoes because that’s what I had, but you can use any variety of fresh tomatoes you have. …

carrot-swede-fritters

Carrot and Swede Fritters with Coriander and Lime Chutney

  I wish we all had three day weekends. One night to recuperate from the long week we just had, one night to party hard and another to recover from the partying – in that order. Don’t get me wrong, I love work, but three day weekends would make me a very happy bunny indeed. Speaking of bunnies… In this week’s recipe, grated carrots, swede and sweet potatoes are bound together with nutty chickpea flour and spices to create these light and crispy fritters. Dip them in a spicy coriander and lime chutney and the flavours come alive. I wanted these fritters to remain a beautiful orange colour, keeping the filling grated and not mashed. In order to do this, I blanched the whole carrots, swede and sweet potatoes for around 6 minutes, refreshed in iced water and then grated them. This way, the vegetables became bright coloured and part-cooked, yet still held their shape. These would make a great starter as part of an Indian or international menu and are perfect for lunch or …

potato-gratin

Two Potato, Chilli and Cumin Gratin

I don’t know about you but cold weather always makes me lazy. I crave simple, hearty dishes which leave me feeling satisfied and ready to cosy up on a welcoming sofa with a good cookbook. This Two Potato, Chilli and Cumin Gratin is just the trick for such occasions. A combination of sliced potatoes and sweet potatoes, baked in an aromatic infusion of cream and earthy spices is about as comforting as you can get – all you need is a spoon and an appetite to fill.     You can serve this as a vegetarian main course for Christmas, a side for your Christmas dinner, or a substantial starter. This is just the kind of dish I want to make ahead of time, wrap up in foil and effortlessly pop into the oven after a long days work. Serve this gratin with a leafy green salad and it’s the most perfect, inexpensive winter meal. I adore the crisp, golden edges which catch in the heat of the oven and add an abundance of flavour …

paneer-butter-masala

Paneer Butter Masala

  Continuing our homemade paneer theme over the weeks is just as much a treat for me as it is for you. Trust me. One of my favourite paneer dishes is Paneer Butter Masala, whereby chunks of soft paneer are folded into a creamy and sharp tomato sauce made luxurious with unadulterated butter. Hand me a teardrop sheet of puffy, soft naan to mop up all of that sauce and I’m in seventh heaven.   When I wrote the recipe post for Homemade Paneer, I took the opportunity to invite you all to complete my Big Paneer Survey. I asked you about your favourite paneer dishes and how often you like to indulge yourself with them. Well, all will be revealed when the results are posted up next week. The response has been great and I’m so excited to explore them further. If you still haven’t had a chance to complete the Paneer Survey, you can do so here. Take the Big Paneer Survey.     I saw one of my favourite chefs, Sanjay Thumma …

potato-spring-onion

Gujarati Potatoes and Spring Onions Sautéed in Chickpea Flour

      Fresh flavoured, dry curries are done so well by Gujaratis. It’s all about taking simple ingredients and packing in as much flavour as possible. From thalis (3 course meal plates), to dhokras (steamed savoury cakes) and mistan (Indian sweets), the simplicity and variety of Gujarati cuisine is a huge attraction for vegetarians. Around three-quarters of the population of Gujarat are vegetarian for an assortment of reasons. Among religious, economical and health reasons, many Gujarati’s believe that the abundance of nuts, beans and leafy greens available in their region neutralises the need to eat meat. Having said this, Gujarati food is simple, family cooking which can coax the most radical meat-eaters into enjoying a vegetarian meal. This dish is just one of those typical Gujarati specialities which can be adapted according to what produce is in season and available at the time. Chickpea flour curries are great with okra, fresh fenugreek leaves and even whole chilli peppers! That is if you’re feeling brave enough. Why not check out my recipe for Turnip and …

kasodi

Kasodi- Ugandan Sweetcorn Cobs in a Peanut and Coconut Sauce

This is vegan. Just had to mention that shocking fact as this is by far one of the creamiest, richest, most delicious dishes I have ever tasted. Having recently posted the Gujarati-inspired African dish Hot and Sour Tamarind Cassava, I have decided to share a little more of these rare combinations with you. Note: I’m currently considering coining this sort of food under the term ‘Gujafrican’ cuisine- pretty accurate if you ask me. These recipes have been simmering in the karahis my family of cooks for year upon years, and now everyone loves a little cassava, sour mango, coconut milk and other delicious East African ingredients. Gujafrican cuisine is light, moreish and perfect for long summer evenings. Let me warn you, once you start cooking these dishes they will leave an everlasting impression upon your tastebuds, which you will never forget. This recipe uses no onions or garlic, and so the dish is flavoured using alternative aromatic spices. Sweetcorn and cumin are like bride and groom; they hold hands, dance, and totally love each other, …

paneer-peas-spring-rolls

Roll Up! Roll Up! Paneer, Sweetcorn and Peas Spring Rolls

I like nothing more than a good spring roll. Add paneer to the mix and you’re halfway there. I think a good spring roll is summed up by a well seasoned, well spiced filling, and a light, crisp pastry. But this recipe doesn’t make a good spring roll. It makes a whole lotta delicious, taste bud tingling spring rolls. Follow these steps and you won’t be able to keep your mitts off of them. I made my own paneer by splitting (with ¼ cup lemon juice) around 3 pints of whole, boiling milk, then straining through a piece of cheesecloth. I then pressed the paneer in the cheesecloth with weights to remove excess liquid. If you don’t want to do this then you can buy a block of paneer from any good supermarket, and grate it to use in this recipe. Peas, sweetcorn and coriander add a mouth-watering lightness that pairs beautifully with the dense paneer. For spicing, I use whole cumin seeds, sesame seeds and lots of coarsely ground black pepper; these ingredients are …