All posts tagged: deep fried

Daal Vada

Bullet Banana Daal Vada

Happy 2014! It’s a new year and time to start getting excited about the adventures ahead. This year I get to marry my best friend and biggest supporter in all my work and passions. I have never felt so excited and nervous in my whole life. I thought it would only be right to begin the year with a recipe that’s close to my heart; one which combines my love for Gujarati and East-African food in a beautiful way. Traditional Gujarati Daal Vada are crunchy, spicy and perfect for dipping into yoghurt. My East-African version incorporates bananas to add a hint of sweetness against the intense chilli and lemon heat. The magical thing about adding ripe banana to the batter is that it reacts with the lemon and baking powder, creating a puffy, fluffy-in-the-middle fritters that still have an incredible golden crunch on the outside because of the ground mung daal, urad daal and rice. For me, rice is an important addition to any Daal Vada recipe because it ensures the fritters are crispy on …

Mandazi Barazi

Swahili Breakfast: Mandazi and Barazi

I spent some time in Mombasa almost five months ago. It’s safe to say I’ve missed sipping on fresh madaf (coconut water) on Bamburi beach, eating fried cassava crisps doused in lemon juice and chilli on the side of the road, and feasting in mind-blowing authentic Swahili restaurants by moonlight. I ate a lot that week. For me, the most incredible thing about East African food is the simplicity of ingredients that go into a dish and the unbelievable flavours that are produced. Basic seasonings like salt, sugar, lemon and chilli are paramount to everyday cooking. Spices like cardamom and turmeric are also popular, although they are used sparingly. Whilst cassava, beans and ground rice make up the majority of the diet, fruit and veg are showcased in such a simple, yet delicious way that vegetarian food is an absolute pleasure to eat. My wonderful aunt and uncle in Mombasa are blessed to have a garden full of palm trees, banana trees and fresh herbs, which allow them to indulge on the freshest exotic ingredients …

Tandoori Paneer Samosas

Tandoori Paneer Samosas

  Attention all paneer lovers! There’s nothing more satisfying than taking a big bite out of a crispy, spicy samosa with a fabulous filling. Whether it’s soft potato and pea, hearty mung daal or juicy tandoori paneer, these little triangles of heaven are an iconic element of Indian cuisine. Let’s be honest, making samosas from scratch is a labour of love and well worth the effort once you’re finally able to take a spicy bite. My advice? Enlist the help of a slave to help with the rolling and folding. I love nothing more than fresh samosa pastry made with chapatti dough. The hearty texture of homemade dough surpasses unsatisfying filo pastry samosas by a mile. Reminiscent of the samosas made by street vendors in the heart of Mumbai, and the kind Indian mothers make for their families, the roti dough pastry gives you that warm, fuzzy feeling inside. A good tandoori paste is deeply aromatic, hot and sour. The combination of Kashmiri chillies, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom and peppercorns makes this paste intensely flavourful and …

Mombasa-style Kachori

Mombasa-style Daal Kachori

Spiced Daal and Green Mango in Flaky Pastry Deep fried starters; once you eat one, you’ll always go back for a second. Fact. Kachori are like the forgotten little sister of samosa – the underdog starter that accidently slipped through the fingers of Western restaurateurs. I cannot emphasise enough how good lentils are with sweet, hot and sour flavours. The addition of sour green mango cuts through the richness of the daal and spices and balances the deep heat of the chillies, ginger and cinnamon perfectly. These kachori are inspired by those sold at the famous Bhagwanjis sweet mart in Mombasa, Kenya. My entire family raves about Kenya-style kachori and these, along with Bateta Vada, are guaranteed to put a smile on my dad’s face. And I can vouch that he has great taste. Kachori come in all flavours, shapes and sizes. You can stuff the classic flaky pastry with crushed green peas, urad daal or even potatoes. They can be made into UFO-like patties and topped with yoghurt, chopped onions and tomatoes to make …

masala-poori

Masala Poori

  The world of Indian breads is vast and varied. From rotli to naan, paratha and poori, they can be toasted, baked or fried. Adding herbs and spices is common and I love experiment with different flavours. My favourite kind of poori has got to be infused with turmeric and red chilli and is also known as Masala Poori   Serve with Sukha Aloo (Dry Potato Curry) and creamy yogurt for am amazing breakfast or brunch. Poori is also popularly served with spicy chickpea curry and is eaten with the hands, filling the fried bread with curry and broken from the outside in. Fiddly but delicious.   Traditionally a South Indian bread, they can be made into large discs or little puffy balls. I prefer to make them smaller firstly because they’re cute and secondly, because they rise much more easily which is great if you’re a beginner. Sooji or semolina is added to give the bread a crisp finish and it is popularly eaten with Shrikhand at auspicious times. Let me tell you, that …

saffron-doughnuts-feat

Eggless Saffron and Lemon Shrikhand Doughnuts

Just a speedy note before I round up all of the dishes from our Mughlai season this weekend (for your eating pleasure). This is going to include all of the royal-inspired recipes plus more, so stick around for some really yummy dishes so you can create a banquet fit for kings and queens. Yesterday, a KO Rasoi recipe for Saffron and Lemon Shrikhand Doughnuts was featured in the Food Network UK Month of Doughnuts calendar in support of National Doughnut Week (7th-14th May). In addition to this, the recipe also went out in their fabulous food newsletter which you can sign up to here: Sign up to the Food Network UK newsletter in order to get my new Food Network UK recipes delivered to your inbox fresh from the kitchen. I thought I would join in the fun and go dough-nuts too – and so my recipe for Saffron and Lemon Shrikhand Doughnuts was born. Please visit the site to take a peek at how I created this recipe and as always, have a go …

mung-dal-paneer-samosa

Little Mung Daal and Paneer Samosas

Isn’t miniature food always better than supersized food? Take cupcakes for instance; tiny morsels of individually iced, fluffy cake is so much more alluring than a massive, calorie-laden, brick-ish cake. Well, for me anyway. In the same way, I would always pick a box of tiny chocolate truffles over a chunky chocolate bar. If you had given me the choice when I was a child I would have definitely supersized every time. Hence the regrettable existence of the unsightly pot-belly that tormented me in my early years.   I consume far too much salt, sugar and fat, which I am told will affect my twentysomething body in a number of gruesome ways before I hit my thirties and forties. This is one of those recipes which will carry most of the blame. Luckily for you, I miniaturised these delicious mung daal and paneer samosas so that you can enjoy them without all of the guilt and fear of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Just don’t eat all of them at once. Having said …

spinach-puri

Puffy, Fluffy Spinach and Green Chilli Puris

Puris (plural) [also spelt ‘pooris’] are a kind of unleavened Indian flatbread which are hugely popular at weddings. They are typically kept plain or spiced with turmeric and chillies and always, always deep fried. They are beautifully soft, puffy and fluffy and can be eaten with curries, rice, soups, sweet yogurt (shrikhand) and even rolled and dipped in sweet chai for breakfast. You can eat them hot, warm or cold, although I prefer them balloon-like, straight from the hot wok (which I use to deep fry in).   Fluffy. My tormentor.   I’ve flavoured these puris with fresh leaf spinach and green chillies which I pureed with a little boiling water. The only problem is that now I can’t stop finding excuses to devour one every time I wander into the kitchen. Don’t call the psychiatrist just yet, though. First, make them and wait to see if the same thing happens to you. If it does, then you’re welcome. Donations are also welcome, as are love letters (to be sent directly via e-mail). Puris are stupidly …

paneer-peas-spring-rolls

Roll Up! Roll Up! Paneer, Sweetcorn and Peas Spring Rolls

I like nothing more than a good spring roll. Add paneer to the mix and you’re halfway there. I think a good spring roll is summed up by a well seasoned, well spiced filling, and a light, crisp pastry. But this recipe doesn’t make a good spring roll. It makes a whole lotta delicious, taste bud tingling spring rolls. Follow these steps and you won’t be able to keep your mitts off of them. I made my own paneer by splitting (with ¼ cup lemon juice) around 3 pints of whole, boiling milk, then straining through a piece of cheesecloth. I then pressed the paneer in the cheesecloth with weights to remove excess liquid. If you don’t want to do this then you can buy a block of paneer from any good supermarket, and grate it to use in this recipe. Peas, sweetcorn and coriander add a mouth-watering lightness that pairs beautifully with the dense paneer. For spicing, I use whole cumin seeds, sesame seeds and lots of coarsely ground black pepper; these ingredients are …