All posts tagged: peas

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Potato and Pea Coconut Milk Curry

Potato and Pea Coconut Milk Curry

One of my favourite quick dinners growing up was pea and potato curry.  It’s a simple staple in every Gujarati home and perfect with just rice and/or Homemade Chapattis – Gujarati Rotli depending on how hungry you are. Not forgetting the obligatory dollop of natural yoghurt, which brings any dinner together. My brother wouldn’t even touch his dinner unless there was a pot of yoghurt on the table. He still doesn’t. This was one of those after-school meals that, when scooped up with garam garam rotli would give you the same feelings as you get when you cuddle your mum, curl up in your cosy bed and hear your favourite song all at the same time. For me, it’s always been the epitome of comfort food. It can be done with just tomato sauce and whole cumin seeds but I’ve injected a little more richness and flavor into the sauce with a touch of coconut milk and some sesame seeds.  I love the flavour combination of sesame seeds and potatoes. Silky soft potatoes simmered in …

Paneer Bhurji Kati Rolls (4)

Paneer Bhurji Kati Rolls

This is not just any old wrap. This is a flavoursome, satisfying chapatti wrap filled with rich paneer, tangy lemon and mouth-watering spices. Seriously, M&S would be proud. These kati rolls are simple, filling and perfect for lunch or dinner. You can stuff them with anything you like, from scrambled paneer to Bombay potatoes. Traditional kati rolls come from Kolkata where they are essentially a kebab wrapped in paratha. Just like sandwiches and wraps you’ll find all over the world, from gyros to banh mi, kati rolls are a street food favourite because they lend themselves to eating on-the-go – a must in any bustling city. My take on kati rolls combines my passion for paneer bhurji (North Indian-style spiced, scrambled paneer) and hot chapattis. I figured if I was going to fill something with pure paneer and vegetables, I’d better use a chapatti rather than ghee-filled paratha. If you’re not bothered about the extra calories, I’d recommend you go the whole hog and wrap your bhurji in hot, buttery paratha. There’s nothing quite like it. …

Stuffed Naan Pockets with Spicy Pizza Dip

Stuffed Naan Pockets with Spicy Pizza Dip

Two of my favourite things in the world are naan and pizza. I love them in all shapes and forms from classic peshwari naan to hybrid naan pizzas – especially when they involve cheese, green veggies and lashings of garlic. I’ll be honest, getting home from a long day at work and sitting down to a naan pizza made with shop-bought garlic and coriander naan and leftover paneer butter masala is one of the most incredible dinners ever! Don’t believe me? Try it yourself. Here’s a simple recipe that celebrates my love of naan and pizza in an easy-to-eat fashion. My recipe for naan pockets uses crumbled paneer and crushed peas as a stuffing for the deliciously-light and buttery naan envelopes. They’re folded into the classic teardrop shape, brushed with a mixture of butter and turmeric, sprinkled with kalonji seeds, and then baked in a hot oven until golden. If you’re not a fan of paneer, these are also great with a filling of grated broccoli and spinach, steamed sweet potato, and cauliflower and green …

aubergine-curry

Mashed Aubergine and Green Pea Curry

Traditional Gujarati cuisine is about simple ingredients paired with simple flavours. This is not a traditional Gujarati dish, however. Yes, I tweaked it and I’m not even sorry. It grew out of my love of the wonderful aubergine dish ‘oroh’, a.k.a ‘baingan bharta’. Almost every Indian region has its own version of this recipe and if that isn’t enough evidence of its popularity, its predominance in Indian restaurants all over the world is. If you’re looking for something hot and spicy then this is the dish for you. The chances are that you will find lots of variations of this recipe the world over and every Indian family has their own aubergine secrets. For, these are the best kind of secrets to have, of course. Aubergines have their own special place in so many cuisines, and there are wonderful ways to make them more interesting than you may think. While Italian Nonnas roast them for hearty pastas, Greek Yayas stew them in rich tomato stews; as Japanese Oka-samas deep fry them in light tempura batter, …

kofta-salad-fi

Tarragon Laced Khoya Kofta and Vegetable Medley

The third recipe in the KO Rasoi Summer BBQ Season 2010 is a blinder. Full of fresh flavours and totally unique. I love kofta. Some of you may already know this, having seen my recipes for Melt in the Mouth Paneer Kofta and Springtime Kofta. Some of you are yet to bear witness to my kofta obsession. This recipe combines khoya (milk solids), spinach and tarragon to create little bites of heaven to top this summery vegetable medley. Harmonious indeed. While technically this is not an entirely barbecued dish, some elements have been slightly charred on the barbecue to bring out their delicate sweetness. I barbecued some parboiled asparagus and courgette strips and added them to sweet Summer peas, then coated them in a dressing of extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice, zest and aromatic garlic. Everything was topped off with deep fried crispy tarragon leaves. Perfect. Tarragon has a heady anise-like flavour which pairs wonderfully with the rich, creamy khoya and fresh vegetables. Although, it is also important to remember not to add too …

matar-bhaat

Matar Bhaat- Fluffy Basmati Rice with Fresh Peas

This dish of fluffy, buttery rice with peas alongside a bowl of kadhi encapsulates everything it means to be Gujarati. Ever been to a Gujarati wedding? If so, you’ve probably eaten this before. You’ve heard me say it a hundred and one times before but I know I’ll be saying it again and again; hot, sweet, sour, savoury, fresh and aromatic. These are the flavours of matar bhaat and kadhi and the flavours of Gujarat. I’ve eaten these dishes so many times that a fillet of Sanjana probably tastes similar. That’s not an invitation- you know very well that this is a vegetarian blog. Well, you get the picture. Hot, sweet, sour… blah, blah, blah.   This is a remembered recipe passed on to me by my idol, my mum. She taught me her father’s recipe for matar bhaat and I personally challenge you to unearth a better version of the dish. I’m positive that Nanabapu’s recipe is probably being served to the Rishimunnis (those having reached enlightenment) up in the fluffy, white clouds of …

springtime-kofta

Springtime Kofta!

s After falling in love with paneer kofta, I decided that I wanted everyone to be able to enjoy my recipe for soft, delicious kofta in that silky sauce- minus the paneer. I know that paneer isn’t to everyone’s liking due to its high fat content and trust me, you will never miss the paneer in this recipe. Those with high cholesterol should steer clear of saturated fats which is why I have used angelic olive oil in this recipe. Almonds, like all nuts contain natural oils (the good kind) which contribute to the sauce’s rich and creamy consistency. I love using pureed nuts in place of cream in Indian sauces, as they deliver wonderful buttery textures and flavours. I like to call it ‘cheating the system’. Having said this, it is also important to remember that if you have high cholesterol, to always eat these good fats in moderation. I created this Springtime Kofta recipe with spiced green bananas in a beautifully silky pea and almond sauce for those who love rich foods, but …

Raghda Patties

Eating the street food from all over the world is one of the best ways of experiencing the particular cultural identity of that country and region. Forget dining in fancy restaurants and five star luxury hotels… just get out there and munch. Soak up all of that tradition and absorb the magical flavours that the locals are used to. Street vendors are the professional chefs of the outdoors. Raghda Patties (pronounced: RughRa PETi-ce) just one of those street dishes you have to try once. This fast food is like no other MacD’s, BK’s or KFC’s. Here’s how we make traditional Gujarati style Raghda Patties at home. They have an East African influence with the raw mango or apple because the majority of my parents’ generation were born and raised there. I plan to post more East African street food/snack food recipes soon because they are so blissful to eat! For the outer covering combine: 4 medium floury potatoes cooked and mashed 275g paneer, finely grated 2 slices of stale bread (with crusts removed), made into …